What Can We Learn from a Failed Return to the Moon?

Casey Dreier • April 26, 2019 What Can We Learn from a Failed Return to the Moon? The lessons of The Space Exploration Initiative, 30 years later A first-term President makes a surprise announcement and directs NASA to return humans to the Moon and then on to Mars. NASA scrambles to redesign their existing plans to meet Read More

The Grey Whale in the Eastern Pacific

The distinctive grey whale (no dorsal fin, and it’s a little hairy!) shown beautifully breaching in the Sea of Cortez – Grey whale breach via Shutterstock One of the most hunted whales in the Pacific, the grey is a large intermediate type between the rorquals and the right whales. The western population are still recovering Read More

Curiosity Update, Sols 2313-2387: Two New Drill Holes Despite Memory Problems

Emily Lakdawalla • April 25, 2019 Curiosity Update, Sols 2313-2387: Two New Drill Holes Despite Memory Problems The Curiosity team is touring Glen Torridon, the Valley of Clay, south of Vera Rubin Ridge, happily photographing everything and zapping rocks. It’s clearly a delight for the team to be in a place they’ve been hoping to reach for Read More

Desert memories and route guidance – for ants

The view from afar. This superb photograph shows the Tunisian desert, the food source and the single visual landmark. The ants would traverse past the landmark on one side and then continue to the distant nest; Cataglyphis ant image; Credit: © Matthew Collett The famed ability of ants to traverse hot desert sand from a Read More

InSight Detects Some Very Small Marsquakes

Emily Lakdawalla • April 23, 2019 InSight Detects Some Very Small Marsquakes InSight has finally detected its first Marsquakes, but so far, none have been large enough to produce good science. Still, it’s great news that the seismometer is producing sensible data. Read More

Sea cucumbers. A big future for this sea creature?

A humble sea creature is being hailed as the possible solution in the campaign to save the world’s oceans from pollution. Scientists at Newcastle University, in North East England, working with colleagues in Africa, say the sea cucumber is important because it is responsible for cleaning up the sea bed by consuming and mixing marine Read More

Chang’e-4 Updates: Yutu-2 Roves into Overtime, Returns More Images

Andrew Jones • April 22, 2019 Chang’e-4 Updates: Yutu-2 Roves into Overtime, Returns More Images China’s Chang’e-4 lander and Yutu-2 rover are continuing to function well and have completed their fourth lunar day since landing on the far side of the Moon on 3 January 2019 this year. Though no real science results have emerged yet, scientists Read More

Conference of The Wildlife Society coverage part II

White-tailed deer via Shutterstock Part II of the Conference of The Wildlife Society coverage taking place in Waikoloa, Hawaii. Landscape genetics used to study chronic wasting disease (in deer) Midwestern White-tailed deer suffer from CWD. The recent discovery has become worse as USGS used landscape genetics and spatial analysis to study the pattern of infection Read More

Adapting an iPhone for Astrophotography

Barney Magrath • April 19, 2019 Adapting an iPhone for Astrophotography Global smartphone sales topped 1.5 billion last year. Many of those phones came equipped with impressive cameras, yet as far as I know, a smartphone image has never shown up on NASA’s Astronomy Picture of the Day website. That doesn’t mean you can’t use your phone Read More

The artful crocodiles can hunt cooperatively.

The salt-water or estuarine croc. exhibits a great range of abilities that we should disregard at our peril. In this fabulous photograph, look at those eyes and imagine that ancient brain is now thought capable of cooperative hunting at a level comparable with the most advanced mammals and birds.; Estuarine crocodile image; Credit: © Shutterstock Read More

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